Brent Skorup

Brent Skorup

  • Research Fellow

Brent Skorup is a research fellow in the Technology Policy Program at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. His research topics include radio spectrum rights, antitrust, new media regulation, and telecommunications.

He has provided expert commentary for news outlets including C-SPAN, CNN Money, The Washington Post, and Buzzfeed. He has authored pieces for law reviews, The New York Times, WIRED, Re/code, Reason, and elsewhere. He also contributes to the Technology Liberation Front, a leading technology policy blog. 

Brent has a BA in economics from Wheaton College and a JD from the George Mason University School of Law.  He was formerly the Director of Research at the Information Economy Project at George Mason University School of Law, a law and economics research center.

Published Research

Working Papers

Testimony & Comments

Brent Skorup | Jul 24, 2014
From time to time the FCC must reexamine the justifications for its rules. In light of the many industry changes since these rules were promulgated, the FCC should repeal these rules and others. The FCC cannot fix all of the regulatory distortions in the video marketplace, but repealing network nonduplication and syndicated exclusivity rules is an excellent first step.
Brent Skorup | Jun 20, 2014
Notwithstanding the DACA recommendations for a reconstituted communications competition agency, Congress should also consider alternatives such as abolishing the FCC entirely and relying on antitrust agencies or merging the FCC’s responsibilities with the Federal Trade Commission.
Brent Skorup | Apr 25, 2014
Former senior Federal Communications Commission (FCC) officials Gerald Faulhaber and David Farber noted without irony that US spectrum policy resembles GOSPLAN, the Soviet planning agency that distributed scarce inputs to producers in every sector of the Soviet economy. The woeful inefficiencies and waste resulting from the current system of regulatory allocation are predictable, yet avoidable.
Brent Skorup | Mar 18, 2014
Current television law makes programming agreements circuitous and distorts market forces. The Congressional Research Service says that “the negotiations between programmers and distributors, although private, are strongly affected by statutory and regulatory requirements and cannot be properly characterized as free-market.” Every television industry segment has received some regulatory favors though the decades. Most concerning is that there is “a thicket of communications law requirements aimed at protecting and supporting the broadcast industry,” as the Copyright Office has said.

Expert Commentary

Jun 26, 2014

The Supreme Court reversed the decision of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, unfortunately, and ruled that Aereo violates copyright law with its cloud-based television system. Future online technologies are possibly at risk of litigation and copyright liability because of legal uncertainly created by the Court about the bounds of copyright.
Jun 18, 2014

The federal court striking down the FCC’s net neutrality rules gave the FCC regulatory tools to enable more broadband competition. Rather than attempt to meddle in peering agreements, the FCC should turn its focus to pressuring states and localities into fast-tracking new, commercial broadband rollouts.
May 15, 2014

What should we expect from the F.C.C.'s new rules to regulate Internet providers, and what does the future hold for network neutrality?
May 13, 2014

Unfortunately, the orchestrated reaction in recent weeks might spark rash political decision-making, and leave us with onerous rules, delaying or making impossible new broadband services. Hopefully, in the ensuing months, reason wins out, and FCC staff are persuaded by competitive analysis and possible innovations, not T-shirt slogans.
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