Christopher Koopman

Christopher Koopman

  • Research Fellow

Christopher Koopman is a research fellow with the Project for the Study of American Capitalism at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He specializes in regulation, competition, and innovation, with a particular focus on public choice and the economics of government favoritism.  His research and commentary has appeared in the Wall Street JournalUSA TodayBloomberg, NPR, and the Daily Beast. He is also a contributor at The Hill.

Koopman earned his J.D. from Ave Maria University and his LL.M. in law and economics at George Mason University where he now teaches in both the economics department and the George Mason University School of Law.

Published Research

Working Papers

Charts

Policy Briefs

Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Scott Eastman | May 17, 2016
Certificate-of-need (CON) programs are state laws that require government permission for healthcare providers to open or expand a practice or to invest in certain devices or technology. These programs have been justified on the basis of achieving several public policy goals, including controlling costs and increasing access to healthcare services in rural areas. Little work has been done, however, to measure what effects CON programs have on access and distribution of healthcare services. Two recent studies that examined the relationship between a state’s CON program and access to care found that these laws failed to achieve their stated goals.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Scott Eastman | May 16, 2016
Certificate-of-need (CON) programs are state laws that require government permission for healthcare providers to open or expand a practice or to invest in certain devices or technology. These programs have been justified on the basis of achieving several public policy goals, including controlling costs and increasing access to healthcare services in rural areas. Little work has been done, however, to measure what effects CON programs have on access and distribution of healthcare services. Two recent studies that examined the relationship between a state’s CON program and access to care found that these laws failed to achieve their stated goals.
Eli Dourado, Christopher Koopman | Dec 10, 2015
We report on new data received from the Internal Revenue Service that sheds light on the changes in independent contracting. Our data support the claim that there has been an increase in nontraditional employment, but the data refute the idea that this increase is caused by the sharing-economy firms that have arisen since 2008. Instead, we view the rise of sharing-economy firms as a response to a stagnant traditional labor sector and a product of the growing independent workforce.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Mohamad Elbarasse | Jun 09, 2015
Thirty-six states and the District of Columbia currently limit entry or expansion of health care facilities through certificate-of-need (CON) programs. These programs prohibit health care providers from entering new markets or making changes to their existing capacity without first gaining the approval of state regulators. Since 1975, Arkansas has been among the states that restrict the supply of health care in this way, with six devices and services—including nursing home beds and long term care beds, psychiatric services, and assisted living and residential care facilities—requiring a certificate of need from the state before the device may be purchased or the service offered.

Testimony & Comments

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Media Clippings

Expert Commentary

Jun 27, 2016

On its face, it may look like the Legislature is trying to chase business out of the Empire State. But this isn’t an anti-business crusade. Airbnb, Uber and Lyft are just part of the wrong industry.
Jun 24, 2016

Disregarding the role of state and local governments will leave much of the problem unchanged. Only when Washington takes fundamental reform at a state-level seriously will everyone have a genuine chance to go out and succeed in the manner that Ryan has suggested.
May 16, 2016

A review of the literature shows that there is no clear evidence that certificate or need laws control costs; in fact, some studies suggest they may do the opposite.
May 11, 2016

Technology will always outpace regulation, but it requires a different set of incentives, plus a dose of humility, for regulators to admit that a regulation’s day is done.
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