Christopher Koopman

Christopher Koopman

  • Research Fellow

Christopher Koopman is a research fellow with the Project for the Study of American Capitalism at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He specializes in regulation, competition, and innovation, with a particular focus on public choice and the economics of government favoritism.  His research and commentary has appeared in the Wall Street JournalNew York Times, Washington Post, USA TodayBloomberg, and NPR. He is also a contributor at The Hill, and was named to Forbes’ 30 Under 30 2016 for law and policy. 

Koopman earned his J.D. from Ave Maria University and his LL.M. in law and economics at George Mason University where he now teaches in both the economics department and the George Mason University School of Law.

Published Research

Working Papers

Charts

Policy Briefs

Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Scott Eastman | May 17, 2016
Certificate-of-need (CON) programs are state laws that require government permission for healthcare providers to open or expand a practice or to invest in certain devices or technology. These programs have been justified on the basis of achieving several public policy goals, including controlling costs and increasing access to healthcare services in rural areas. Little work has been done, however, to measure what effects CON programs have on access and distribution of healthcare services. Two recent studies that examined the relationship between a state’s CON program and access to care found that these laws failed to achieve their stated goals.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Scott Eastman | May 16, 2016
Certificate-of-need (CON) programs are state laws that require government permission for healthcare providers to open or expand a practice or to invest in certain devices or technology. These programs have been justified on the basis of achieving several public policy goals, including controlling costs and increasing access to healthcare services in rural areas. Little work has been done, however, to measure what effects CON programs have on access and distribution of healthcare services. Two recent studies that examined the relationship between a state’s CON program and access to care found that these laws failed to achieve their stated goals.
Eli Dourado, Christopher Koopman | Dec 10, 2015
We report on new data received from the Internal Revenue Service that sheds light on the changes in independent contracting. Our data support the claim that there has been an increase in nontraditional employment, but the data refute the idea that this increase is caused by the sharing-economy firms that have arisen since 2008. Instead, we view the rise of sharing-economy firms as a response to a stagnant traditional labor sector and a product of the growing independent workforce.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Mohamad Elbarasse | Jun 09, 2015
Thirty-six states and the District of Columbia currently limit entry or expansion of health care facilities through certificate-of-need (CON) programs. These programs prohibit health care providers from entering new markets or making changes to their existing capacity without first gaining the approval of state regulators. Since 1975, Arkansas has been among the states that restrict the supply of health care in this way, with six devices and services—including nursing home beds and long term care beds, psychiatric services, and assisted living and residential care facilities—requiring a certificate of need from the state before the device may be purchased or the service offered.

Testimony & Comments

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Media Clippings

Expert Commentary

Aug 23, 2016

While the federal mandate was repealed, the laws had already been passed in nearly every state. And bad policy, especially one that creates the types of winners and losers that CON programs do, can be difficult to undo.
Aug 15, 2016

The Florida legislature had the right idea by shortening this year’s tax holiday. But a policy that fails for 10 days will also fail for three days. A convoluted tax code —which tells you you’re getting a break while hiding the cost somewhere else — hurts more than it helps. The Sunshine State should let the sun set on its sales tax holiday.
Aug 09, 2016

But sales tax holidays are not a loss for everyone. Favored retailers and manufacturers win, while others lose. It all depends on what makes it on the list of tax-free items. As a result, tax-free holidays have more to do with who has the best lobbyists than what kids actually need for school.
Aug 08, 2016

As it turns out, hosting the Olympics isn’t that different from competing in the games: It requires a great deal of effort, stamina and a willingness to achieve what you set out to do. When it comes to hosting, however, winning might be worse than losing. Rio should enjoy its time in the Olympic limelight, because it will certainly pay for it come September.
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