Donald J. Boudreaux

Donald J. Boudreaux

  • Senior Fellow
  • Martha and Nelson Getchell Chair for the Study of Free Market Capitalism, Mercatus Center
  • Senior Fellow, F. A. Hayek Program

Donald J. Boudreaux is a senior fellow with the F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a professor of economics and former economics-department chair at George Mason University. He holds the Martha and Nelson Getchell Chair for the Study of Free Market Capitalism at the Mercatus Center. He specializes in globalization and trade, law and economics, and antitrust economics.

Boudreaux is committed to making economics more accessible to a wider audience, and he has lectured across the United States, Canada, Latin America, and Europe on a wide variety of topics, including antitrust law and international trade. He is the author of the books Hypocrites and Half-Wits: A Daily Dose of Sanity from Cafe Hayek and Globalization. His articles appear in such publications as the Wall Street Journal and US News & World Report as well as numerous scholarly journals. He writes a blog (with Russell Roberts) called Cafe Hayek and a regular column on economics for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. He has appeared numerous times on John Stossel’s Fox show to discuss a range of economic issues.

Previously, he was president of the Foundation for Economic Education and an associate professor of legal studies and economics at Clemson University. He also serves as an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute.

Boudreaux earned a PhD in economics from Auburn University and a law degree from the University of Virginia.

Published Research

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Expert Commentary

Jul 10, 2014

It's simply untrue that when government repays its creditors with money devalued by inflation, taxes aren't raised. Taxes are raised. But in this case the burden of the higher taxes falls disproportionately and unfairly on government's creditors.
Jun 26, 2014

Evidence is readily available against Piketty's naive notion that, as the rich “claim” larger and larger shares of national income, they will successfully oppose “progressive” government policies. According to Piketty himself, income inequality in America today is near an all-time high. Yet the last two U.S. presidential elections saw decisive victories for one of the most “progressive” and pro-redistribution candidates ever to run for that office.
Jun 10, 2014

Thomas Piketty's 2014 volume, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” will likely become the most influential economics book since John Maynard Keynes' 1936 “General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money.” That's quite an accomplishment for professor Piketty. But also like Keynes, Piketty's popularity springs more from his cleverness at justifying certain government policies rather than from the soundness of those attempted justifications.
May 31, 2014

Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century might soon stand with Karl Marx'sCapital, which inspired its title, as one of the most influential economic masterworks of the past 150 years. But sad to say, this 696-page tome, ably translated by Arthur Goldhammer, is no more enlightening about capitalism in the 21st century than Marx'sCapital was about capitalism in the 19th century.
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