James Broughel

James Broughel

  • Program Manager, Regulatory Studies Program

James Broughel is program manager of the Regulatory Studies Program at the Mercatus Center. Mr. Broughel is a doctoral student in the economics program at George Mason University. He earned his MA in economics from Hunter College of the City University of New York.

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Expert Commentary

Jul 22, 2014

To improve the present situation, OIRA needs more resources. The agency's budget and staffing levels have fallen significantly over time, even as regulatory agency spending continues to swell. OIRA should have the authority to review all guidance documents, policy memos, waivers and other agency publications.
May 16, 2014

Unfortunately, the myopic gaze of regulators will often focus on the issue in front of them and ignore important tradeoffs. The peril here is that we will likely see policies with costs that are out of proportion to the benefits they produce. If policymakers really want to improve general welfare, they should care less about energy efficiency and start worrying about economic efficiency.
Mar 17, 2014

With Congress at an impasse that’s likely to continue past the midterm elections, the administration is gearing up its regulatory activity so it can finish important initiatives before the end of President Obama’s term. Although the current administration has three years left to work on regulations, if the past is any guide, don’t expect a lot of them to be very well thought out.
Aug 05, 2013

Energy and fuel efficiency regulations aim to reduce emissions from power plants and slow increases in global temperatures. Proponents of such regulations, including the present administration, refer to these types of policies as "common sense" on a regular basis. But the recent energy efficiency rules proposed by the Department of Energy and other agencies are being justified on the basis of correcting "irrational" consumer behavior, not on the basis of benefits to the environment.

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