Health Care

Health Care

Research

Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann | Feb 24, 2015
While CON programs were intended to limit the supply of health care services within a state, proponents claim that the limits were necessary to either control costs or increase the amount of charity care being provided. However, 40 years of evidence demonstrate that these programs do not achieve their intended outcomes, but rather decrease the supply and availability of health care services by limiting entry and competition.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann | Feb 12, 2015
While CON programs were intended to limit the supply of health care services within a state, proponents claim that the limits were necessary to either control costs or increase the amount of charity care being provided. However, 40 years of evidence demonstrate that these programs do not achieve their intended outcomes, but rather decrease the supply and availability of health care services by limiting entry and competition.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann | Feb 04, 2015
While CON programs were intended to limit the supply of health care services within a state, proponents claim that the limits were necessary to either control costs or increase the amount of charity care being provided. However, 40 years of evidence demonstrate that these programs do not achieve their intended outcomes, but rather decrease the supply and availability of health care services by limiting entry and competition.
Matthew Mitchell, Anna Mills, Dana Williams | Jan 15, 2015
In this paper we discuss three ways that states can benefit patients by making their health care markets more competitive: they can abolish certificate-of-need laws, liberalize scope-of-practice regulations, and remove barriers to telemedicine.
Robert Emmet Moffit, Neil Meredith | Jan 13, 2015
In a new study for the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, scholars Robert Emmet Moffit and Neil R. Meredith demonstrate that while the MSP Program grants new power to the OPM by setting standards designed to limit entry into the program, the law may decrease competition and increase consolidation in the health insurance market. Decreased competition in the health care market may lead to higher prices for consumers of health care and could revive calls for a public health insurance option.
Robert Graboyes | Oct 20, 2014
This paper suggests some potential policy actions to shift health care from Fortress to Frontier, and toward a goal of producing better health for more people at lower cost on a continuous basis.

Testimony & Comments

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Expert Commentary

Feb 13, 2015

Repealing the medical device tax, which is a targeted and discriminatory tax, does not constitute a special interest favor. The medical device industry provides life-saving products to people who need them, and should not be imposed with what is the equivalent of sin tax. The industry currently has to pass through multiple regulatory hurdles that other industries do not. Repealing the medical device tax would therefore be a return to a more level and equitable playing field.
Feb 02, 2015

Gruber’s repeated expressions of support for the ACA, combined with his compensation by the administration, do begin to call into question whether he was more of an advocate, and less of an unbiased technical expert or disinterested economics professor, thereby undercutting his responsibility to do his job as an academic. That key ethical and professional issue does not apply to just Gruber. It applies to some in the academic community who seem to operate as advocates for one side or the other or who primarily engage in political commentary. Is that the appropriate nature of an academic faculty job, even in part?
Jan 26, 2015

The next big wave of innovation, if it is allowed, is in health. The only question is whether we will embrace the new pioneers of health innovation or smother them in wet woolen blankets of regulation. The choices are fairly stark: We can settle for the status quo of turning everything into a “policy” or embrace policy-less innovation.
Jan 12, 2015

Why, in the case of the Affordable Care Act, do we force journalists and ordinary Americans to play an utterly unnecessary game of “guess how many beans are in the jar?" The result wastes time and resources, diverting our attention from more substantive issues such as, “How is the law actually affecting the health and the pocketbooks of Americans?”…
Jan 09, 2015

Shifting health care to the Frontier opens the possibility of real progress — of better health for more people at lower cost, year after year. This approach also offers alternatives to the all-encompassing ACA and its earth-shattering repeal-and-replace alternatives. My paper suggests a few dozen small initiatives to begin the transition. There are hundreds more waiting just behind. If we so choose.
e21
Nov 10, 2014

The ACA contains myriad problems; these and other provisions will come under increased scrutiny going forward. As lawmakers approach repairs, they will need to bear in mind what is politically achievable as well as what is fiscally responsible.

Charts

Currently, 35 states and the District of Columbia prohibit entry or expansion of healthcare facilities through “certificate-of-need” (CON) programs. These laws, which require government permission before a facility can expand, offer a new service, or purchase certain pieces of equipment, were enacted in the belief that restricting entry would lower health care costs and increase availability of these services to the poor.

Experts

Charles Blahous is the director of the Spending and Budget Initiative, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a public trustee for Social Security and Medicare. He specializes in domestic economic policy and retirement security (with an emphasis on Social Security), as well as federal fiscal policy, entitlements, demographic change, and health-care reform.
Robert Graboyes is a senior research fellow for the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.
Christopher J. Conover is an affiliated senior scholar at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a research scholar at the Center for Health Policy & Inequalities Research at Duke University.
Jerry Ellig is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a former assistant professor of economics at George Mason University. He specializes in the federal regulatory process, economic regulation, and telecommunications regulation.
Michael L. Marlow is an affiliated senior scholar at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and professor of economics and distinguished scholar at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

Podcasts

Casey B. Mulligan | October 14, 2014
Casey B. Mulligan Discusses the Affordable Care Act on the John Batchelor Show

Recent Events

Please join us for lunch with Mercatus Center Senior Research Fellow Jason Fichtner to discuss pro-growth policy options. He’ll also address the research and ideas Mercatus shares with policymakers in order to advance the debate on economic issues.

Books

Media Clippings

Casey B. Mulligan | Oct 09, 2014
This excerpt originally appeared in The Washington Times.
Robert Graboyes | Sep 25, 2014
This excerpt originally appeared in Reuters.
Charles Blahous | Jun 04, 2014
This excerpt originally appeared in CQ and also appeared Roll Call.
Robert Graboyes | Jan 29, 2014
Robert Graboyes cited at Star-Telegram.
Tyler Cowen | Oct 30, 2013
Tyler Cowen cited at The Washington Post.
' '