Health Care

Health Care

Research

Brian Blase, Doug Badger, Edmund F. Haislmaier | Apr 22, 2016
This is the first in a series of papers in which we provide the most comprehensive analysis to date of the impact of the ACA on the individual and small group insurance market in 2014. In this overview, we provide information on how insurers fared in their first year selling QHPs—plans that satisfy all of the ACA’s requirements and are certified to be sold on exchanges—using a data set compiled from medical loss ratio form that insurers are required to file with the Department of Health and Human Services.
Eric Sun, Kelly Ferguson | Apr 20, 2016
In 2002, Congress passed the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act, with the aim of pushing the FDA to speed up the approval process for medical devices. This law levied large user fees on medical device manufacturers in exchange for the promise of shorter review times by the FDA. Whether the act has resulted in shorter review times has been unclear. This study conducted a regression analysis to address this question, using data on FDA review times for devices seeking approval between 1991 and 2012.
James C. Capretta | Mar 08, 2016
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is known primarily for its provisions that subsidize and regulate health insurance for the working-age population and their families, but it also made many important changes to the Medicare program. Perhaps the most important of those changes is a new upper limit on Medicare spending, enforced by the Independent Payment Advisory Board, or IPAB.
James C. Capretta | Feb 23, 2016
Advances in information technology and knowledge of human health have the potential to revolutionize the way medical care is delivered to patients over the coming decade. Americans could get better health care, at less cost, if those delivering services to patients have the freedom to take full advantage of what these advances make possible.
Thomas Stratmann, Christopher Koopman | Feb 18, 2016
We examine the effect of entry regulation on ambulatory surgical centers and community hospitals and find that there are both more rural hospitals and more rural ambulatory surgical centers per capita in states without a certificate-of-need program regulating the opening of an ambulatory surgical center. This finding indicates that certificate-of-need laws may not be protecting access to rural health care, but are instead correlated with decreases in rural access.
Brian Blase | Feb 16, 2016
Medicaid’s complex federal-state financing structure has long created perverse incentives that discourage efficient care. Key to the problem is the federal government’s uncapped reimbursement of state Medicaid expenditures, which encourages states to artificially inflate their Medicaid spending. Such schemes have significantly increased over the past several years and they likely add tens of billions in generally low-value Medicaid spending each year.

Testimony & Comments

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Expert Commentary

Apr 28, 2016

The commonwealth of Kentucky is famous for many great things: fried chicken, a major horse race and baseball equipment, to name a few. Unfortunately for the citizens of the Bluegrass State, it is also the only state that does not allow physician assistants to prescribe controlled substances.
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Apr 26, 2016

Anti-giggers demonize companies like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb by romanticizing and reinforcing the most hated aspects of post-1800 employment—subordination of and control over employees by employers. This blinkered nostalgia threatens employability in a world of smart machines.
Apr 25, 2016

In 2017, for the first time, insurance premiums alone must cover expenses in the individual market. A new working paper released today by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University measures the importance of this subsidy program, sheds new light on insurers’ generally poor results in 2014, and discusses what likely lies ahead for the law.
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Apr 06, 2016

While it is true the ACA has expanded health insurance coverage, its effects on health prices are yet unknown and its effects on the labor market and the federal fiscal outlook are almost certainly damaging.
Apr 04, 2016

Despite substantial and growing federal deficits, largely driven by unsustainable healthcare commitments, the Obama Administration is proposing more than $100 billion in new Medicaid spending over the next decade. No major area of federal spending has increased more dramatically since President Barack Obama took office than Medicaid, and recent evidence indicates that the program is failing both enrollees and taxpayers. Instead of spending more on the program, Congress should reject the president’s new Medicaid proposals, particularly the three I discuss below, and focus on structural reforms to the program.
Mar 16, 2016

Just like the end-of-the year 2015 enrollment data, a close look at the 2016 open enrollment data reveals that the ACA is significantly underperforming initial expectations.

Charts

Certificate-of-need (CON) laws in 21 states restrict acquisition of imaging equipment, including MRI, CT, and PET scans. These CON requirements effectively protect established hospitals from nonhospital competitors that provide medical imaging services, such as independently practicing physicians, group practices, and other ambulatory settings. In the process of protecting hospitals from these nonhospital providers, CON laws limit the imaging services available to patients.

Experts

Charles Blahous is the director of the Spending and Budget Initiative, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and has served as a public trustee for Social Security and Medicare. He specializes in domestic economic policy and retirement security (with an emphasis on Social Security), as well as federal fiscal policy, entitlements, demographic change, and health-care reform.
Robert Graboyes is a senior research fellow and healthcare scholar with the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and is the author of the study “Fortress and Frontier in American Health Care.” He earned his PhD in economics from Columbia University. An award-winning teacher, Graboyes holds teaching positions at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Virginia.
Christopher J. Conover is an affiliated senior scholar at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a research scholar at the Center for Health Policy & Inequalities Research at Duke University.
Jerry Ellig is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a former assistant professor of economics at George Mason University. He specializes in the federal regulatory process, economic regulation, and telecommunications regulation.
Jamil Khan is a program coordinator on health care policy for the Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

Podcasts

Brian Blase | January 13, 2016
Brian Blase considers the president’s Affordable Care Act claims in the State of the Union.

Upcoming Events

Recent Events

Please join us for a lunch discussion on the ways Obamacare isn’t working as planned, what may happen with the law under a new Congress and president, and ideas for improving health care policy.

Books

| Sep 29, 2015
In a new set of essays commissioned by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, seven leading policy experts share innovative ideas on how to solve the pre-existing condition challenge. While their approaches exhibit differences as well as similarities, they are unified in their pursuit of a humane, equitable, fiscally sustainable solution to a conundrum that has driven and strained the entire post–World War II healthcare debate.

Media Clippings

Casey B. Mulligan | Oct 09, 2014
This excerpt originally appeared in The Washington Times.
Robert Graboyes | Sep 25, 2014
This excerpt originally appeared in Reuters.
Charles Blahous | Jun 04, 2014
This excerpt originally appeared in CQ and also appeared Roll Call.
Robert Graboyes | Jan 29, 2014
Robert Graboyes cited at Star-Telegram.
Tyler Cowen | Oct 30, 2013
Tyler Cowen cited at The Washington Post.
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