Robert Graboyes

Robert Graboyes

  • Senior Research Fellow

Robert Graboyes is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He specializes in the economics of healthcare.

Previously, he was a sub-Saharan Africa economist at Chase Manhattan Bank, a regional economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, and an economics professor at the University of Richmond. Twice he was a visiting health care scholar in the Republic of Kazakhstan. He has chaired the National Economists Club and the Healthcare Roundtable of the National Association for Business Economics.

Graboyes earned his PhD in economics from Columbia University and has a MSHA from Virginia Commonwealth University, MPhil from Columbia University, and a MA in government from the College of William and Mary. An award winning teacher, he holds teaching positions at Virginia Commonwealth University, and the University of Virginia.

Published Research

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Expert Commentary

Jan 12, 2015

Why, in the case of the Affordable Care Act, do we force journalists and ordinary Americans to play an utterly unnecessary game of “guess how many beans are in the jar?" The result wastes time and resources, diverting our attention from more substantive issues such as, “How is the law actually affecting the health and the pocketbooks of Americans?”…
Jan 09, 2015

Shifting health care to the Frontier opens the possibility of real progress — of better health for more people at lower cost, year after year. This approach also offers alternatives to the all-encompassing ACA and its earth-shattering repeal-and-replace alternatives. My paper suggests a few dozen small initiatives to begin the transition. There are hundreds more waiting just behind. If we so choose.
CNN
Oct 24, 2014

Smiling children are using prosthetic hands to open windows through which we can glimpse the future of health care -- a future where outsiders and amateurs innovate along with insiders and professionals. The question is, "Will America lead the way, as it has for a century, or will it fall behind, as it has begun to do?"
Oct 20, 2014

Midterm elections are coming, and both parties are lobbing grenades over health care. Despite the furious rhetoric, the two sides are more alike than they realize. Both spent decades pursuing policies that obstruct health care's capacity to save lives, ease suffering and cut costs. The endless vitriol resembles World War I-style trench warfare. The Affordable Care Act moved the battle lines a little in one direction; the midterms that year moved them a little in the opposite direction. With divided government, the 2014 elections will move the lines even less.
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