Robert Graboyes

Robert Graboyes

  • Senior Research Fellow

Robert Graboyes is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He specializes in the economics of healthcare.

Previously, he was a sub-Saharan Africa economist at Chase Manhattan Bank, a regional economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, and an economics professor at the University of Richmond. Twice he was a visiting health care scholar in the Republic of Kazakhstan. He has chaired the National Economists Club and the Healthcare Roundtable of the National Association for Business Economics.

Graboyes earned his PhD in economics from Columbia University and has a MSHA from Virginia Commonwealth University, MPhil from Columbia University, and a MA in government from the College of William and Mary. An award winning teacher, he holds teaching positions at Virginia Commonwealth University, and the University of Virginia.

Published Research

Research Summaries & Toolkits

Expert Commentary

Oct 20, 2014

Midterm elections are coming, and both parties are lobbing grenades over health care. Despite the furious rhetoric, the two sides are more alike than they realize. Both spent decades pursuing policies that obstruct health care's capacity to save lives, ease suffering and cut costs. The endless vitriol resembles World War I-style trench warfare. The Affordable Care Act moved the battle lines a little in one direction; the midterms that year moved them a little in the opposite direction. With divided government, the 2014 elections will move the lines even less.
Oct 08, 2014

For the fifth autumn in a row, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is spurring waves of health-insurance policy cancellations. As I explained in a recent video and article, some of the most recent cancellations (with more to come in future years) result from an odd and unnecessary regulation that sets up a conflict between the ACA's "metallic tiers" (bronze, silver, etc.) and a phenomenon we can call "actuarial value drift."
Sep 22, 2014

There’s a bizarre reason why millions of Americans saw their health insurance plans cancelled in 2013 – and as explained in a new video put out by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, millions more will lose their plans in years to come.
Aug 04, 2014

Repeal and replace" is a misguided strategy for getting past the Affordable Care Act and moving toward a focus on health rather than insurance cards. It is hopelessly utopian, strategically suicidal, emotionally deadening, operationally hollow, and needlessly partisan.
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