Thomas Stratmann

Thomas Stratmann

  • Mercatus Center Scholar
  • University Professor of Economics, George Mason University

Thomas Stratmann is a scholar at the Mercatus Center and university professor of economics at George Mason University. His primary research interests are political economy, fiscal policy, law and economics, health economics, and experimental economics.

Dr. Stratmann has written on topics of political economy and applied microeconomics and has published in journals such as the American Economic Review, American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economics and Statistics, and the Journal of Law and Economics

Dr. Stratmann received his BA from the Free University of Berlin and his MA and PhD in economics from the University of Maryland.

Published Research

Working Papers

Thomas Stratmann, Joshua Wojnilower | Feb 19, 2015
Using monthly US data on project-grant awards in 2009 and 2010, we study which objectives presidents pursue in distributing resources. We also address theoretical and empirical ambiguities regarding when and which congressional districts receive distributive benefits. Our results show that core constituencies of the president’s party receive more federal funding in both presidential and congressional elections.
Thomas Stratmann, Jake Russ | Jul 15, 2014
In a new empirical study of CON regulation and indigent care, economists Thomas Stratmann and Jacob W. Russ find no evidence that CON regulations increase indigent care, but they do find evi­dence that the regulations limit the provision of medical services. Consequently, the price of medi­cal care is likely higher under CON regulations, while the poorest Americans see no increase in the availability of care.
Hester Peirce, Ian Robinson, Thomas Stratmann | Feb 27, 2014
This paper presents the results of the Mercatus Center’s Small Bank Survey, which include responses from approximately 200 banks across 41 states with less than $10 billion in assets each, serving mostly rural and small metropolitan markets.
Andreea Militaru, Thomas Stratmann | Jan 07, 2014
We analyze the choice politicians face when seeking votes from groups that lobby for sales tax rate decreases or from groups that lobby for certain tax exemptions, given the constraint that each politician wants to raise a certain amount of revenue. Using the application of sales taxes and sales tax exemptions we develop a model predicting a positive relationship between the number of sales tax exemptions and the sales tax rate. We find support for this hypothesis. A one-unit increase in the number of exemptions is associated with an increase between 0.10 and 0.25 percent in the sales tax rate. Our results provide one explanation of why estimates of revenue increases generated by a sales tax increase are often too optimistic.

Charts

Policy Briefs

Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann, Mohamad Elbarasse | Mar 31, 2015
Thirty-six states and the District of Columbia currently limit entry or expansion of health care facilities through certificate-of-need (CON) programs. These programs prohibit health care providers from entering new markets or making changes to their existing capacity without first gaining the approval of state regulators. Since 1979, Georgia has been among the states that restrict the supply of health care in this way, with 17 devices and services—including acute hospital beds, positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, and open heart surgery—requiring a certificate of need from the state before the device may be purchased or the service offered.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann | Mar 24, 2015
Thirty-six states and the District of Columbia currently limit entry or expansion of health care facilities through certificate-of-need (CON) programs. These programs prohibit health care providers from entering new markets or making changes to their existing capacity without first gaining the approval of state regulators.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann | Mar 03, 2015
While CON programs were intended to limit the supply of health care services within a state, proponents claim that the limits were necessary to either control costs or increase the amount of charity care being provided. However, 40 years of evidence demonstrate that these programs do not achieve their intended outcomes but rather decrease the supply and availability of health care services by limiting entry and competition. For policymakers in Florida, this situation presents an opportunity to reverse course and open the market for greater entry, more competition, and ultimately more options for those seeking care.
Christopher Koopman, Thomas Stratmann | Feb 24, 2015
While CON programs were intended to limit the supply of health care services within a state, proponents claim that the limits were necessary to either control costs or increase the amount of charity care being provided. However, 40 years of evidence demonstrate that these programs do not achieve their intended outcomes, but rather decrease the supply and availability of health care services by limiting entry and competition.

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Thomas Stratmann

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